How To Respond To Silly Design Questions

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As much as it is joked about that clients ask designers silly questions and ask for unrealistic things, it is true. If you're a designer you'll know that it's in your clients nature to ask silly questions and to be broad with their queries because they expect you to know what you're doing and there's a certain amount of trust involved.

"Make it pop!", "The target market is everyone!", we see these kind of phrases everywhere, but what's the best way to reply to these? Query Creative cuts through the silliness and humour, offering an alternative approach that designers can use to truly understand the ideas behind the feedback. 

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“Ask the client if there something in particular they’d like to see highlighted. Ask if they have other design examples that display the thing they’re trying to get at. Have a conversation about the overall style/tone they want to achieve.”

“Ask the client if there something in particular they’d like to see highlighted. Ask if they have other design examples that display the thing they’re trying to get at. Have a conversation about the overall style/tone they want to achieve.”

“Ask for some direction. Have a conversation about what the client is trying to achieve. Make it clear that being completely open ended isn’t conducive to good work.” 

“Ask for some direction. Have a conversation about what the client is trying to achieve. Make it clear that being completely open ended isn’t conducive to good work.” 

“Have the client explain specifically what they like about the design, and work within the framework they create; use your own style, but be inspired by that work. Maybe point out the legal/ethical thing if they seem adamant.” 

“Have the client explain specifically what they like about the design, and work within the framework they create; use your own style, but be inspired by that work. Maybe point out the legal/ethical thing if they seem adamant.” 

“Ask about some categorical ways you might narrow an audience: gender, economic class, age range, etc. Make it clear that having a target audience doesn’t mean ignoring those who don’t fit under that umbrella; it’s just about playing to strengths.” 

“Ask about some categorical ways you might narrow an audience: gender, economic class, age range, etc. Make it clear that having a target audience doesn’t mean ignoring those who don’t fit under that umbrella; it’s just about playing to strengths.”